Lost Acres Vineyard – 2012

Lost Acres Vineyard is new to the CT Wine Trail Passport this year and their sign indicating where I should go to enjoy a wine tasting is one of the signs I look for.

But let’s back up for a minute so you can see where the tasting room and other wine activities are conducted.

Did you notice the deck on the right side of the barn structure. Looks like a great place to spend an afternoon sipping some wine while admiring the vineyards.

And yes, this is the path leading up to the tasting room where I have never been before but am willing to take the plunge. When I entered, the tasting room was cool as it was becoming warm outside once the sun was intent on staying for awhile.

As you can see there is ample room to accommodate a lot of wine tasters either at the wine bar or in many of the tables that are set up here. Once inside one of the owners, Michelle welcomed me to the vineyard. The tasting fee is $6 including the CT state tax (I always like it when wineries include the tax within the tasting fee) for trying six wines on their menu. Plus you get their signature wine glass too. So, on to the wines and where the fun begins.

First up was their Chardonnay ($14.99) which opened with lemon, melon, and lemongrass aromas leading into citrus and apple flavors. Serve slightly chilled this was a very good wine to start of the tasting venue.

Next, I tried the Wedge White ($13.99) which is a white blend consisting of Cayuga, Chardonnay, Riesling, Seyval Blanc, Traminette, and Vidal Blanc. I found this wine to have clean crisp citrus aromas and flavors with some good acidity. This would be a great wine to have on their deck enjoying an afternoon with friends.

The next wine on their list was a fruit wine called Old Orchard Apple ($12.99) and as the name suggests you get apple aromas and flavors with a neat little tart apple finish.

The Riesling ($17.99) was next up on the tasting menu and I found lemongrass and fresh cut hay on the nose with a lingering spice cornucopia. This was a really surprising array of aromas and the flavors consisted of sweet apple and pear.

The Rock Wall Red ($15.99) was a blend of Carignane, Gamay, Merlot, and Petit Sirah. This red blend opened with plum, blackberry and jammy aromas. Much the same for the flavors but a nice spice and peppery finish followed leaving a nice mouth-feel on the palate.

The last wine on the list was the Merlot ($13.99). On the nose I found jammy blackberry and wild black cherry and on the palate I found cherry hard candy and plum flavors with a nice complement of pepper. Then I tried a chocolate morsel and this seemed to bring out the plum flavor more and as it turned out the last wine I tasted was my favorite.

If you haven’t stopped here yet, you’ll want to make the trip. One thing that I enjoy so far and I know I’ve only visited two wineries so far but how pleasant and friendly the wine staff and the tasters are so far – let’s hope that the trend continues.

Next week – Arrigoni Winery

Toasted Head 2009 Untamed Red, Barrel Aged

Toasted Head used to be produced by RH Phillips but not sure if that is still the case today. Toasted Head may be under its own nowadays. I tried researching it a bit and didn’t come up with a whole lot of information other than from a staff writer, Melanie Turner at the Sacramento Business Journal that RH Phillips was closing Sept 1, 2009. The Toasted Head brand was to be produced by Mondavi at the Woodbridge region near Lodi.  Not sure if that actually happened as this wine was quite good.

The blend of Syrah, Zinfandel, and Petit Syrah is a well kept secret as I also tried to research the percentages of each varietal but to no avail. But alas, perseverance paid off and I was able to locate Toasted Head’s wine blog and here I found an article by Todd Ziemann titled “How to fit Untamed Red into a bottle” where I found the percentages of the red blend. It was comprised of 50% Syrah, 27% Zinfandel, 13% Petit Sirah, 9% Tempranillo, and 1% Carignan.

On the nose I got black cherry, black currant, fig, smoke, and bacon notes. On the palate I found black and red cherry, black licorice, spice, and pepper flavors with a nice cocoa finish. I enjoyed this wine stand alone and it was actually better the second night. It is reasonably priced at $9.99. I had originally given this wine 7 1/2 wine glasses but changed it to 8 WG due to the improvement of taste on the second night.

Chateau Sainte Eulalie 2007 Minervois La Liviniere

The Chateau Sainte Eulalie wine is a blend of 55% Syrah, 20% Grenache, and 25% Carignan with a dark red color producing aromas that were woody, smoky, toasty, Sneezy, Bashful, and Doc (ah, strike the last three) and ripe red fruits on the nose was quite pleasing.

I’m finding French wines are more enjoyable as I get older (no jokes about aging – the older it gets the better it is, etc, etc, etc) and I’m not sure why but I like it. This wine had a medium bodied structure to it with flavors of black cherry, red cherry and plum prevailing with nuances of smoke and pepper. I enjoyed this with spaghetti and marinara sauce. Priced at $14.99.

 

 

Domaine de la Renjarde 2009 Cotes Du Rhone Villages Massif d’Uchaux

This deep purple French red blend is comprised of 60% Grenache, 20% Syrah, 10% Cinsault, 5% Mourvedre, and 5% Carignane and produced in the Southern Rhone region of France beckons the senses to partake in a trip to France through a bottle. This French wine had a really active nose with aromas of black cherry, plum, boysenberry, clove, and spice propelled your schnozzola from the “slow lane” to “warp speed” hoping that the flavor was as good as what you just sniffed. Well, it didn’t disappoint as the palate experienced dark cherries, vanilla, mocha, and oak. At $14.99 this is a pretty good buy. I’ll need to go back to my wine merchant for more of this.

We paired this with three thin crust pizzas, one with pepperoni and Parmesan Asiago cheese, another with sausage and onions, and the last one had sliced salami and black olives. The wine went perfectly with all of them. I hope the French won’t mind that I paired this wine with pizza. I would also surmise this wine would go well with grilled meats and lamb. BTW, the wine was gone long before the pizzas were.